Wyebot in the Wild: Problems of the Week, Use Cases and More

Problem of the Week: How Responsive is Your Network Infrastructure?

How important is the response time of network infrastructure?  For anyone looking for a high-performing wireless network, the answer is very important.  Network response time, or network latency, is a measurement of the amount of time it takes a packet to travel from sender to receiver.  Response times vary based on the number of users, …

Problem of the Week: How to Train New Network Technicians Without Losing Time for Other Tasks

On the job training is important for any position, but perhaps none more so than for new network technicians. After all, the functioning of your network and success is dependent upon hands-on experience with setup and installation, troubleshooting, and repair. Training new technicians often presents novel challenges and takes current critical people away from the …

Problem of the Week: Should You Disable the 2.4GHz Spectrum?

In an earlier post discussing over-coverage on the 2.4GHz spectrum, we mentioned that we don’t recommend completely disabling the 2.4GHz band.  We got several questions about that, so today we want to discuss it in more detail. First, let’s check out the benefits to disabling the band. There are more channels available in 5GHz, so …

Problem of the Week: Understanding Airtime Utilization

What do we mean by Airtime Utilization?  Free airtime describes how much time is available on a channel for data transmissions.  Any time a device communicates with another device or an access point (AP) it uses airtime. Airtime Utilization is a per-channel statistic that defines what percentage of the channel is currently being used, and …

Problem of the Week: Make Your Wireless Design Fit Your Wireless Needs

Not all networks are exactly alike, and for good reason.  At a basic level, the network you need for your house has different requirements than the network you need for your school, but it gets more complicated than that.  Not even all schools need the exact same network, and this applies to schools in the …

Problem of the Week: Are Site Surveys the Best Investment?

Are you familiar with site surveys?  You probably, and should have, had one when your wireless network was installed, but you might not have thought about it since.  Site surveys determine exactly where access points (APs) should be placed for optimum network performance. Those performing the site survey know that physical obstructions (walls, ceilings) and …

How do you troubleshoot last week’s problems?

It’s an unfortunate fact that, frequently, problems are not reported to IT while they are occurring. Maybe this is because IT isn’t onsite, maybe it’s because the problem seemed to resolve itself quickly, or maybe it didn’t seem like a big enough problem to warrant flagging down IT. Whatever the reason, the fact is that …

How well is your WLAN controller’s auto-channel working?

A WLAN controller’s auto-channel capability can be used to manage the wireless channels used by all the Access Points (APs) in a network.  This can be a great way to ensure all APs select optimum channels based on usage and interference levels, but it does require some monitoring.  Some APs don’t recognize RF interference and …

When “the WiFi is down” but it isn’t the WiFi

From a user’s point of view, any issue with connecting to the Internet is an issue with the WiFi.  Users turn to each other and complain that the WiFi is down again, and that’s what they expect IT to fix.  But anyone working in IT knows that the WiFi is only one part of a …

Problem of the Week: Wireless Printers

Wireless printers seem like a great option.  They allow users to print from multiple different devices in multiple different locations, giving an ease of use perhaps not felt with wired printers.  However, they might be negatively impacting your network performance.   How? Many wireless printers send out beacons just like Access Points.  These beacons are …

Over-Coverage on 2.4GHz

Channel interference is a common problem, and you’ve read about it at Wyebot before.  Our previous post discussed interference on the 5GHz spectrum.  Today we want to address issues with the 2.4GHz spectrum. Typically we see schools place one AP in every classroom, as well as several in hallways or other common areas.  There are …

Why You Shouldn’t Deploy More Than 3 SSIDs

SSIDs (service set identifiers) are, in non-technical terms, the names of WiFi networks.  These are the names that pop up when you try to log onto the WiFi in a coffee shop, hotel, or business.  Each SSID creates its own overhead (network traffic) as it transmits probes and beacons to devices, and receives probes.  In …

WiFi Unreliability and IoT Plugs

A school’s building department wanted to conserve energy and purchased 1000 IoT wall plugs.  Different devices, such as printers, can be plugged into the IoT plugs, and the IoT plugs in turn plugged into a standard outlet.  Like all IoT devices, the plug can be controlled via WiFi using an app.  The building department planned …

Is Rogue Detection Causing You More Problems than it Solves?

Most wireless LAN controllers have a functionality referred to as IDS/IPS (intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system).  The IDS monitors a network and sends alerts to administrators if there is an attack while the IPS goes a step further and automatically takes action to prevent attacks.  Using the functionality, Access Points (APs) can be programmed to …

Increasing Throughput in Dense Environments

On the 5GHz spectrum, there are three possible channel widths: 20MHz, 40MHz, and 80MHz.  In dense environments such as schools, we often see clients immediately jump to the 80MHz bandwidth, assuming the wider channels will provide better speeds and service.  While this can be the case in less crowded environments, schools will actually see better …

What can I do to fix or reduce the multicast/broadcast traffic in my wireless network? Part 2 of 2

In part one of the series, we discussed what multicast/broadcast traffic is, and why you should worry about having too much of it on your network.   This week we want to share the 9 possible mitigation solutions. They are: Make smaller broadcast domains Use multicast to unicast conversion (if available with your AP vendor) …

Why should you worry about too much multicast/broadcast traffic on your wireless network? Part 1 of 2

This is Part 1 of a two-part problem/resolution series Multicast and broadcast traffic are a normal part of all networks today.  Many devices use multicast/broadcast traffic to advertise and discover services on the network.  Protocols such as Bonjour and MDNS make streaming to an Apple TV or connecting to a printer simple – but that …

Picking the Right Capacity Plan

A client purchased the latest and greatest access point (AP) to create a space where every device in their school would get over 25 Mbps. However, a quick check on device analytics revealed that they were operating at a far lower streaming speed.  The client wondered if there was an issue with the AP, or …

“I’ve tried everything possible and cannot figure it out.”

One of our clients, a school whose programs cover Pre K through 9th grade, uses around 20 smartboards throughout its campus.  When smartboards in certain parts of the school stopped working, students’ education was directly impacted.  IT personnel at the school troubleshot potential issues in several areas – software, hardware and the WiFi – with …

Not Another Tool in Your WiFi’s Belt

Does this sound familiar?  You attend a tradeshow and learn about a new WiFi monitoring/analytics tool.  You get excited and sign up for a training session, but then the training is complicated.  Perhaps the tool doesn’t provide all the information you need; or it’s too complex to use, requiring an expert to be onsite; or …

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Wyebot in Use: Extra Support Always Available

At Wyebot, our team has a combined 75 years of WiFi experience. We used that experience to create a best-in-class, enterprise-grade, Autonomic WiFi Assurance™ solution.  Our Wireless Intelligence Platform™ (WIP) is a “network-engineer-in-a-box,” providing proactive insights and actionable steps for network optimization that can be followed even if you aren’t a network engineer; and if …

Identifying a Malfunctioning Access Point

Wireless networks are complex, dynamic ecosystems.  Isolating a single component in order to solve problems can be incredibly difficult, especially when you consider the massive amount of traffic now being exchanged on a typical wireless network.  Parsing through this volume of data to manually identify problems is impractical. This is why it can be so …

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Wyebot in Use: When an AP Controller Can’t Identify an Issue

A private school in Massachusetts had around 100 Access Points (AP) and very few WiFi complaints – except for when it came to their auditorium. WiFi in the auditorium would periodically, and randomly, stop working. The school’s technical director and network engineer would reboot the AP and everything would work for several hours or days, …

Wyebot in Use: A Massachusetts’ School District

When the teachers and students at the high school in one of the largest school districts in central Massachusetts started complaining about its wireless network, the district’s network administrator knew exactly what to do.  Working with the building’s technology person, he took Wyebot’s Wireless Intelligence Platform™ (WIP) and designed a test scenario to really stress …

Avoiding the Rabbit Hole: Direct Answers and Quick Resolution with Wyebot

THE PROBLEM: A school was having issues with their network and were unsure why. The teachers and students were having serious performance issues on the secure network versus the guest network. Therefore, staff was frequently using the guest network instead of the secure network. WIP INVESTIGATES: The School was doing a trial of the Wyebot …

Wyebot in Use: Tampa Preparatory School, Tampa, FL

There are about 680 middle and high school students at the Tampa Preparatory School, and about 2000 wireless devices on the school’s network.  This includes personal devices and the school’s Apple TVs and iPads. If WiFi stops working on the campus, in some ways, the classrooms shut down.  Wireless access is critical for learning and …

Keeping Students on Track with Secure Networks: An Education Use Case

A teacher’s day starts early with him or her reviewing lesson plans, checking e-mail, and pulling up an educational video or resource on the Internet.  Whether using a personal laptop or a school-issued device, the morning won’t be the only time the teacher needs to pop on the network.  Partway through the morning, they are …

Working with the Intel Unite Solution

The Intel Unite® solution is a wireless content sharing and collaboration platform used across the enterprise, education, and healthcare industries. That congestion means that Loza and his team spend a lot of time troubleshooting to ensure their set-up is optimal for an issue-free demonstration. When Loza discovered the Wireless Intelligence Platform (WIP), it immediately grabbed his attention.

A Proactive Solution Unlike Any Other

For a school that relies so heavily on its wireless infrastructure, Bishop Verot Catholic High School luckily has a generally-issue free network. However, when issues do occur, it takes a lot of trial-and-error to hunt down the root cause and resolve the problem. For this reason, Bishop started looking for a WiFi analytics solution that would allow the school to proactively resolve issues.

With Wyebot, a Vermont School District Stays Ahead of the Curve

Wyebot devices proactively help the Lamoille North Modified/Unified Union School District diagnose and troubleshoot issues – before they develop into problems.

Wireless Intelligence Platform (WIP) Keeps 17,000 Connected at World Cup Skiing Event

As one of the premier women’s skiing events in the country, the Audi FIS Women’s Ski World Cup at Killington Resort in Vermont needed reliable wireless technology to keep the event going.